Alternative History
Advertisement
2021 IIHF World Championship
2021 IIHF World Championship (WFAC).svg
Tournament details
Host country Latvia
Dates 5 February – 21 February 2021
Teams 16
Venue(s) (in 1 host city)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg Canada Canada (27th title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg Finland Finland
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg United States
Fourth place Germany Germany
Tournament statistics
Matches played 64
Goals scored 338 (5.28 per match)
Attendance (0 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Canada Nathan MacKinnon (CAN)
(16 points)
MVP Canada Connor McDavid (CAN)
2020
2023
Ishockey
2021 IIHF Men's
World Championship
Tournaments
Top Division
Division I
Division II
Division III
Division IV
Rosters
Top Division
2020 2023

The 2021 IIHF World Championship was the 75th edition of the Ice Hockey World Championships hosted by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF). It took place from 5 to 21 February 2021 in Riga, Latvia.

The tournament was largely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The tournament was hosted in a "bubble" behind closed doors, with no spectators admitted for any game. A "bubble" concept was implemented where the teams will be totally isolated from the surroundings. The Italian team was hit hard by COVID-19 in the run-up to the tournament, with a total of 15 infected.

The final was a repeat of the final of the previous year. Canada avenged the final loss and claimed its 27th title after defeating Finland in the final 3–2 in overtime. No team in IIHF history at any top-level event had won gold after losing four games (including losing its first three games), and had only qualified for the playoffs by fortuitous results elsewhere in the group. The United States won bronze after beating Germany 6–1.

The tournament offered several upsets by smaller ice hockey nations over the favorites. Switzerland and Slovakia surprised by reaching the top of the group while Germany, Denmark, Latvia and Japan played evenly with the top nations and fought for a place in the quarterfinals. Denmark beat Sweden for the first time ever in a world championship game while the Latvian hosts beat Canada for the first time ever. Newly promoted Japan surprised by beating Finland for the first time ever (after a penalty shootout), Latvia (after a penalty shootout) and Germany. The Netherlands beat Sweden while Britain surprised by losing to Denmark in overtime. Canada had a historic weak start to the tournament with losses to Latvia, Germany (first since 1996) and the United States (largest loss to the United States ever). Sweden had a historically weak championship with losses to Denmark and the Netherlands and failed to qualify for the playoffs for the first time.

COVID-19 pandemic

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Latvian government declared on 6 November 2020 a state of emergency in effect from 9 November to 6 December (later extended until 7 February 2021) in order to control the spread of COVID-19, due to an increase in infection rates. Among the restrictions that were further tightened were related to sport activities, as international and professional sports competitions were allowed if held without spectators. All games were scheduled to be held behind closed doors with no outside spectators.

The IIHF announced on 18 November 2020 that they had cancelled the all lower-division tournaments (Divisions I, II, III and IV), meaning there would therefore be no relegations this year. The IIHF Council also announced that the top division tournament would implement a "bubble" strategy similar to what has been used for the NHL's 2020 Stanley Cup playoffs in Edmonton and Toronto and the 2021 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships.

The tournament was organized under strick quarantine rules:

  • The main venue was the Arena Riga in Riga
  • The second venue was the Daugava Stadium Hall
  • The Olympic Sports Centre, across the street from Arena Riga, served as the practice arena with two ice sheets.
  • All 16 participating teams were be housed in one hotel (Radisson Blu Hotel Latvija)

Teams arrived in Riga on 27 January; all players and staff were in self-isolation for three days before being let out in a "secure zone" consisting of their hotel, a restaurant, practice facilities, and the arenas. COVID-19 testing were administered to players and staff every day (for a total of 7 000 PCR tests), as well as daily temperature and symptom checks. Individuals have to wear masks outside their hotel rooms except when eating, exercising, or while on the ice or bench. Other exceptions included during interviews with appropriate social distancing. The identities of those who tested positive were not released to the public, they would then be isolated and designated with the generic description "unfit for play" until they were medically cleared.

All travellers entering Latvia at the time were required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. The national teams received an exception to this policy for its players and staff, as long as they remained within the secure zone and were restricted from access to or by the general public. Anybody who left the bubble without prior approval will face a mandatory 10-day quarantine or be barred from returning. National federations could have also face fines.

Bidding process

Latvia had originally submitted an application to host the 2020 Ice Hockey World Championship, competing with a bid from Switzerland. However, Latvia later announced they had withdrawn their application for 2020, leaving Switzerland as the only applicant. At the annual IIHF congress in Prague on 15 May 2015, the 2020 tournament was allocated to Switzerland along with the 2021 tournament to Latvia.

Latvia has earlier hosted the IIHF Ice Hockey World Championship in 2007.

Venues

Latvia – Riga
Arēna Rīga 2021 IIHF World Championship arena map (WFAC).svg Daugava Stadium Hall
Capacity: 10,300 Capacity: 8,000
Arēna Rīga.jpg Daugava Stadium Hall, Riga.jpg

Qualification

No teams were relegated at the 2020 IIHF World Championship due to the 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic forcing the IIHF to cancel the tournaments for the lower divisions in 2020.

Date Vacancies Qualified
Qualified as host N/A 1 Latvia
Automatic qualifier after a top 16 placement
at the 2020 IIHF World Championship
7 – 23 February 2020 15 Canada Canada
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
Denmark Denmark
Finland Finland
France France
Germany Germany
United Kingdom Great Britain
Italy
Japan
Netherlands
Norway Norway
SOC[1]
Sweden Sweden
United States United States
Total 16


  1. 1 Pursuant to a December 2020 ruling by the Court of Arbitration for Sport on doping sanctions, Soviet athletes and teams are prohibited from competing under the Soviet flag or using the Soviet national anthem at any Olympic Games or world championships through 16 December 2022, and must compete as "neutral athlete[s]." For IIHF tournaments, the Soviet team will play under the name "SOC".

Seeding

The seeding in the preliminary round was based on the 2020 IIHF World Ranking, as of the end of the 2019 IIHF World Championship, using the serpentine system with a swap between Canada and SOC and between Norway and France to "accommodate special organizational needs".

Group A Group B
Canada Canada (1) Sweden Sweden (2)
Finland Finland (3) SOC (4)
United States (5) Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia (6)
Germany Germany (8) Switzerland (7)
Latvia Latvia (9) Denmark Denmark (10)
Norway Norway (11) France France (12)
Italy (13) Netherlands (14)
Japan (18) United Kingdom Great Britain (17)

Rosters

Each teams roster for the 2021 IIHF World Championship consisted of at most 28 players – and thus higher than usual due to the COVID-19 conditions. At the first Directorate meeting, the teams must name at least the minimum number of 15 skaters and 2 goalkeepers. The players entered must be present at the championship venue by the time of the Directorate meeting. The remaining players up to the allowed maximum of 28 must be submitted for players' control two hours before any of the following championship games. Players can be added throughout the tournament until the roster is full.

During a game, a team may enter (dress) 20 skaters and 2 goalkeepers on the Official Game Sheet, with the emergency goalkeeper standing by if a goalie entered to the Official Game Sheet is unable to play.

Officials

The IIHF selected 18 referees and 18 linesmen to work the tournament. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and travel restrictions, the majority of the selected on-ice officials were working their games in Europe instead of North America. For the first time the game officials were split into units of six officials (three referees, three linesmen) who would stay together while officiating and practicing.

Exhibition games

Prior to the start of the tournament, all 16 teams played one exhibition game each.

Exhibition games
1 February 2021
12:15
Yugoslavia 0 – 2
Austria Austria Arēna Rīga, Riga
1 February 2021
12:15
Norway Norway 0 – 4
Denmark Denmark Daugava Stadium Hall, Riga
1 February 2021
16:15
Soviet Union File:Soviet Olympic Committee flag.svg 4 – 1
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia Arēna Rīga, Riga
1 February 2021
16:15
Switzerland 1 – 2 OT
(0–0, 0–1, 1–0, 0–1)
Germany Germany Daugava Stadium Hall, Riga

2 February 2021
12:15
Latvia Latvia 2 – 0
France France Arēna Rīga, Riga
2 February 2021
12:15
Italy 2 – 3
United Kingdom Great Britain Daugava Stadium Hall, Riga
2 February 2021
16:15
Canada Canada 4 – 2
Sweden Sweden Arēna Rīga, Riga
2 February 2021
16:15
United States 0 – 3
Finland Finland Daugava Stadium Hall, Riga

Preliminary round

The schedule was released on 1 August 2020.

All times are local (UTC+2).

Group A

Team GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
United States 7 6 0 0 1 21 8 +13 18 Advances to the quarterfinals
Finland Finland 7 4 2 1 0 19 10 +9 17
Germany 7 4 0 0 3 22 14 +8 12
Canada Canada 7 3 0 1 3 19 18 +1 10[a]
Japan 7 2 2 0 3 16 18 –2 10[a]
Latvia 7 2 0 3 2 15 16 –1 9
Norway Norway 7 2 1 0 4 17 21 –4 8
Italy 7 0 0 0 7 11 35 –24 0
  1. a. Japan 2–4 Canada.
5 February 2021
16:15
Germany Germany9 – 4
(2–2, 5–0, 2–2)
ItalyArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
5 February 2021
20:15
Canada Canada0 – 2
(0–1, 0–1, 0–0)
Latvia LatviaArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

6 February 2021
12:15
Norway Norway1 – 5
(0–1, 1–3, 0–1)
Germany GermanyArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
6 February 2021
16:15
Finland Finland2 – 1
(0–0, 2–1, 0–0)
United StatesArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
6 February 2021
20:15
Latvia Latvia2 – 3 GWS
(0–0, 1–1, 1–1, 0–0)
(SO: 0–1)
JapanArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

7 February 2021
12:15
Norway Norway4 – 1
(1–0, 2–0, 1–1)
ItalyArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
7 February 2021
16:15
Japan 2 – 1 GWS
(0–0, 1–1, 0–0, 0–0)
(SO: 1–0)
Finland FinlandArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
7 February 2021
20:15
Canada Canada1 – 5
(0–1, 0–3, 1–1)
United StatesArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

8 February 2021
16:15
Latvia Latvia3 – 0
(0–0, 1–0, 2–0)
ItalyArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
8 February 2021
20:15
Germany Germany3 – 1
(2–1, 0–0, 1–0)
Canada CanadaArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

9 February 2021
16:15
United States 3 – 0
(1–0, 1–0, 1–0)
JapanArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
9 February 2021
20:15
Finland Finland5–2
(1–1, 2–0, 2–1)
Norway NorwayArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

10 February 2021
16:15
Japan 3–2
(0–0, 1–2, 2–0)
Germany GermanyArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
10 February 2021
20:15
Canada Canada4 – 2
(2–0, 1–2, 1–0)
Norway NorwayArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

11 February 2021
16:15
United States 4 – 2
(2–2, 2–0, 0–0)
Latvia LatviaArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
11 February 2021
20:15
Finland Finland3 – 0
(2–0, 1–0, 0–0)
ItalyArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

12 February 2021
16:15
Japan 2 – 4
(0–1, 1–1, 1–2)
Canada CanadaArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
12 February 2021
20:15
Latvia Latvia3 – 4 GWS
(2–1, 0–1, 1–1, 0–0)
(SO: 0–1)
Norway NorwayArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

13 February 2021
12:15
Italy 3 – 5
(0–1, 1–2, 2–2)
JapanArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
13 February 2021
16:15
Norway Norway1 – 2
(0–1, 0–1, 1–0)
United StatesArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
13 February 2021
20:15
Germany Germany1 – 2
(0–1, 1–0, 0–1)
Finland FinlandArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

14 February 2021
16:15
Italy 1 – 7
(0–4, 1–2, 0–1)
Canada CanadaArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
14 February 2021
20:15
Finland Finland3 – 2 OT
(1–1, 1–0, 0–1, 1–0)
Latvia LatviaArena Riga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

15 February 2021
16:15
United States 2 – 0
(0–0, 1–0, 1–0)
Germany GermanyArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
15 February 2021
20:15
Norway Norway3 – 1
(0–1, 1–0, 2–0)
JapanArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

16 February 2021
12:15
Canada Canada2 – 3 GWS
(1–0, 1–1, 0–1, 0–0)
(SO: 0–1)
Finland FinlandArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
16 February 2021
16:15
Italy 2 – 4
(0–3, 1–1, 1–0)
United StatesArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
16 February 2021
20:15
Germany Germany2 – 1
(2–0, 0–1, 0–0)
Latvia LatviaArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

Group B

Team GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
SOC 7 5 1 0 1 28 10 +18 17 Advances to the quarterfinals
Switzerland 7 5 0 0 2 27 17 +10 15
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 7 3 2 0 2 27 18 +9 13
Denmark Denmark 7 3 1 1 2 15 13 +2 12
Sweden Sweden 7 3 0 1 3 21 14 +7 10
France 7 3 0 0 4 15 24 –9 9
United Kingdom Great Britain 7 1 0 1 5 13 31 –18 4[a]
Netherlands 7 1 0 1 5 10 29 –19 4[a]
  1. a. Netherlands 3–4 Great Britain.


5 February 2021
16:15
SOC 4 – 3
(1–1, 1–1, 2–1)
Czechoslovakia CzechoslovakiaDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
5 February 2021
20:15
Netherlands 2 – 5
(0–3, 0–0, 2–2)
France FranceDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]0[note 1]

6 February 2021
12:15
Denmark Denmark4 – 3
(0–0, 3–2, 1–1)
Sweden SwedenDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
6 February 2021
16:15
Great Britain United Kingdom1 – 7
(1–4, 0–1, 0–2)
SOC Daugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
6 February 2021
20:15
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia2 – 5
(1–1, 0–2, 1–2)
SwitzerlandDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

7 February 2021
12:15
Great Britain United Kingdom1 – 2
(0–1, 1–1, 0–0)
France FranceDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
7 February 2021
16:15
Sweden Sweden0–1
(0–0, 0–0, 0–1)
NetherlandsDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
7 February 2021
20:15
Denmark Denmark0 – 1
(0–1, 0–0, 0–0)
SwitzerlandDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

8 February 2021
16:15
France France3–1
(0–0, 1–1, 2–0)
SOC Daugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
8 February 2021
20:15
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia3 – 2 OT
(0–0, 2–1, 0–1, 1–0)
NetherlandsDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

9 February 2021
16:15
Great Britain United Kingdom2 – 3 OT
(1–2, 0–0, 1–0, 0–1)
Denmark DenmarkDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
9 February 2021
20:15
Switzerland 0 – 7
(0–2, 0–2, 0–3)
Sweden SwedenDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

10 February 2021
16:15
SOC 3 – 0
(0–0, 1–0, 2–0)
Denmark DenmarkDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
10 February 2021
20:15
Netherlands 3 – 4
(0–1, 1–2, 2–1)
United Kingdom Great BritainDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

11 February 2021
16:15
Switzerland 8 – 1
(1–0, 3–0, 4–1)
France FranceDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
11 February 2021
20:15
Sweden Sweden2 – 4
(2–0, 0–0, 0–4)
Czechoslovakia CzechoslovakiaDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

12 February 2021
16:15
Sweden Sweden4 – 1
(1–1, 2–0, 1–0)
United Kingdom Great BritainDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
12 February 2021
20:15
Denmark Denmark5 – 2
(1–1, 0–1, 4–0)
NetherlandsDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

13 February 2021
12:15
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia6 – 1
(1–0, 3–1, 2–0)
United Kingdom Great BritainDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
13 February 2021
16:15
Switzerland 1 – 4
(0–0, 0–1, 1–3)
SOC Daugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
13 February 2021
20:15
France France0 – 2
(0–0, 0–0, 0–2)
Denmark DenmarkDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

14 February 2021
16:15
Netherlands 0 – 6
(0–2, 0–2, 0–2)
SwitzerlandDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
14 February 2021
20:15
Sweden Sweden3 – 1
(0–1, 1–0, 2–0)
France FranceDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

15 February 2021
16:15
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia2 – 1 GWS
(0–1, 0–0, 1–0, 0–0)
(SO: 1–0)
Denmark DenmarkDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
15 February 2021
20:15
SOC 3 – 2 GWS
(0–1, 0–0, 2–1, 0–0)
(SO: 1–0)
Sweden SwedenDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

16 February 2021
12:15
Switzerland 6 – 3
(2–1, 4–1, 0–1)
United Kingdom Great BritainDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
16 February 2021
16:15
France France3 – 7
(0–2, 1–2, 2–3)
Czechoslovakia CzechoslovakiaDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
16 February 2021
20:15
SOC 6 – 0
(5–0, 0–0, 1–0)
NetherlandsDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

Playoff round

Seeding order

The semi-final pairings were determined according to the seeding after the preliminary round. The seeding is determined by following criteria in the order presented:

  1. higher position in the group;
  2. higher number of points;
  3. better goal difference;
  4. higher number of goals scored for;
  5. better seeding number entering the tournament (i.e., place in the 2020 IIHF World Ranking).
Rank Team Grp Pos Pts GD GF Seed
1 United States B 1 18 +13 21 5
2 SOC A 1 17 +18 28 4
3 Finland Finland B 2 17 +9 19 3
4 Switzerland A 2 15 +10 27 7
5 Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia A 3 13 +9 27 6
6 Germany Germany B 3 12 +2 22 8
7 Denmark Denmark A 4 12 −5 17 10
8 Canada Canada B 4 10 +1 19 1

Bracket

  Quarterfinal                    
  A1 SOC 1  
  B4 Canada Canada (OT) 2   Semifinal
      3 Finland Finland 2  
  Quarterfinal   6 Germany Germany 1  
  B2 Finland Finland 1
  A3 Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 0         Final
              3 Finland Finland 1
  Quarterfinal             8 Canada Canada (OT) 2
  A2 Switzerland 2      
  B3 Germany Germany (GWS) 3   Semifinal   Bronze medal game
      1 United States 2   1 United States 6
  Quarterfinal   8 Canada Canada 4     6 Germany Germany 1
  B1 United States 6
  A4 Denmark Denmark 1  


Quarterfinals

18 February 2021
16:15
Switzerland 2 – 3 GWS
(1–0, 1–1, 0–1, 0–0)
(SO: 0–1)
Germany GermanyDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
18 February 2021
16:15
United States 6 – 1
(3–0, 1–1, 2–0)
Denmark DenmarkArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
18 February 2021
20:15
SOC 1 – 2 OT
(0–0, 1–0, 0–1, 0–1)
Canada CanadaDaugava Stadium Hall, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
18 February 2021
20:15
Finland Finland1 – 0
(0–0, 1–0, 0–0)
Czechoslovakia CzechoslovakiaArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

Semifinals

20 February 2021
14:15
United States 2 – 4
(1–1, 0–1, 1–2)
Canada CanadaArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]
20 February 2021
18:15
Finland Finland2 – 1
(2–0, 0–1, 0–0)
Germany GermanyArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

Bronze medal game

21 February 2021
15:15
Bronze medal blank.svg United States 6 – 1
(1–0, 4–0, 1–1)
Germany GermanyArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

Gold medal game

Canada had a tough start, incurring 16 minutes of penalties in the opening period to none for Finland. Ten of those came on a 2 + 10 call to Brad Marchand in the early going. Although the Finns didn't capitalize on that man advantage, they did on the second one to John Tavares for high sticking. Jokiharju took a point shot with Mikko Rantanen in front. Rather than tip the puck, Rantanen stopped it, spun and put the puck onto his forehand, and lifted the puck in the open side as he was falling. The penalty to Paul had expired one second earlier, but he wasn’t able to get back in play in time. The Canadians took a third penalty but managed to kill that as well. Canada wasn't able to get any flow to its game, and the big line of Huberdeau–McDavid–MacKinnon managed only a few shifts without testing Rask from in close.

Mark Stone tied the game for Canada early in the second after the Finns took two consecutive penalties that gave Canada 12 seconds on five-on-three in the process. Stone hit the post on the first man advantage, swiping quickly at a loose puck, only to see it miss the empty net and dribble off the iron. Next shift, though, Stone converted. MacKinnon took a long shot that drifted off the crossbar, and this time Stone didn’t miss on the rebound opportunity. The Finns had another power play later in the period, but Hart made his best save of the game when he stoned Granlund from point-blank range. With four minutes left in the period, Canada scored again when McDavid knocked in a rebound, but Finnish coach Jukka Jalonen challenged the play, and sure enough the goal was called back because the entry into the zone was offside.

Canada almost went ahead early in the third on a flukey play. Rask misplayed a shoot-in and the puck bounced off the back of the net and rolled to the side, but Patrice Bergeron couldn't poke the puck in before he was checked. That miss proved costly. Seconds later, Ville Heinola fired a shot from the top of the left faceoff circle through traffic that beat Hart over the glove at 5:27, giving the Finns their second lead of the game. But Canada pressed and drew a power play of their own. And they converted. MacKinnon got the puck to the goal where Stone put the puck between his legs and McDavid poked the rebound in at 12:37, tying the game, 2–2. The rest of the period felt like overtime, but neither team could score before 60 minutes. That set the stage for Brad Marchand's heroics.

Marchand scored at 6:26 of the first three-on-three unlimited overtime to give Canada its 27st all-time gold medal at the World Championship. The goal gave Canada a 3-2 win over Finland and avenged the loss of the year before. The goal came off a faceoff in the Canada end. Granlund won the draw and circled quickly. He made a blind pass that was picked off by Marchand. Marchand roared up ice with MacKinnon on a two-on-one and passed to MacKinnon in the Finland end. MacKinnon controlled the puck and got it back to Marchand, and he knocked it into the open net as Rask played MacKinnon to shoot.

21 February 2021
20:15
Silver medal blank.svg Finland Finland2 – 3 OT
(1–0, 0–1, 1–1, 0–1)
Canada Canada Gold medal blank.svgArēna Rīga, Riga
Attendance: 0[note 1]

Final ranking

Statistics

Scoring leaders

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
Canada Nathan MacKinnon (CAN) 10 2 14 16 +8 2 F
Patrick Kane (USA) 10 6 7 13 +6 6 F
Canada Connor McDavid (CAN) 10 7 4 11 +6 0 F
Canada Steven Stamkos (CAN) 10 6 5 11 +6 0 F
Czechoslovakia David Pastrňák (TCH) 8 5 6 11 +5 6 F
United Kingdom Liam Kirk (GBR) 7 7 2 9 −6 4 F
Auston Matthews (USA) 10 5 4 9 +7 4 F
Matthew Tkachuk (USA) 10 4 5 9 +8 10 F
Grégory Hofmann (SUI) 8 6 2 8 0 0 F
Denmark Nicklas Jensen (DEN) 8 5 3 8 −2 2 F

Goaltending leaders

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played at least 40% of their team's minutes, are included in this list.

Player GKD GPI MIN SOG GA SVS GAA SVS% SO
Sergei Bobrovsky (SOC) 8 6 367:12 254 8 246 1.12 96.85% 2
Connor Hellebuyck (USA) 9 7 417:14 193 9 184 1.29 95.34% 2
Sweden Viktor Fasth (SWE) 9 7 299:44 129 7 122 1.40 94.57% 1
Finland Tuukka Rask (FIN) 9 7 431:26 174 10 164 1.39 94.25% 1
Yutaka Fukufuji (JPN) 7 6 370:00 198 14 184 2.27 92.93% 0

Awards

Directorate awards

Best players selected by the IIHF directorate:

Position Player
Goaltender Connor Hellebuyck (USA)
Defenceman Germany Moritz Seider (GER)
Forward Czechoslovakia David Pastrňák (TCH)


All-Star team

The tournament All-Star team voted by the media:

Position Player
Goaltender Finland Tuukka Rask (FIN)
Defenseman Germany Korbinian Holzer (GER)
Defenseman Germany Moritz Seider (GER)
Forward United Kingdom Liam Kirk (GBR)
Forward Canada Connor McDavid (CAN)
Forward Johnny Gaudreau (USA)
MVP Canada Connor McDavid (CAN)


Best Players of each Team Selected by Coaches

Team Player
Canada Canada Steven Stamkos
Nathan MacKinnon
Connor McDavid
Denmark Denmark Frederik Andersen
Nicklas Jensen
Markus Lauridsen
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia Petr Mrázek
Filip Hronek
David Pastrňák
Finland Finland Tuukka Rask
Heiskanen
Mikko Rantanen
France France Florian Hardy
Kevin Hecquefeuille
Antoine Roussel
Germany Germany Philipp Grubauer
Korbinian Holzer
Leon Draisaitl
United Kingdom Great Britain Liam Kirk
Mark Richardson
Bon Bowns
Italy Daniel Glira
Justin Fazio
Alex Petan
Japan Yutaka Fukufuji
Yushiroh Hirano
Hiroto Sato
Latvia Latvia Ronalds Ķēniņš
Lauris Dārziņš
Rūdolfs Balcers
Netherlands Martijn Oosterwijk
Killian van Gorp
Daniel Sprong
Norway Norway Steffen Søberg
Jonas Holøs
Mathias Trettenes
SOC Sergei Bobrovsky
Ivan Provorov
Andrei Svechnikov
Sweden Sweden Viktor Fasth
Victor Hedman
Nicklas Bäckström
Switzerland Christoph Bertschy
Nico Hischier
Kevin Fiala
United States Patrick Kane
Seth Jones
Connor Hellebuyck

Notes

  1. 1. The match was played behind closed doors due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

See also


Advertisement