Alternative History
Advertisement
XXIV Olympic Winter Games
Tromsø 2022 Olympic logo.svg
Host city Norway Tromsø, Norway
Motto Go beyond. Create tomorrow. (Norwegian: Spreng grenser. Skap morgendagen)
Events 112 in 9 sports (17 disciplines)
Opening 11 February 2022
Closing 27 February 2022
Stadium Valhall stadium
Winter
←  Pyeongchang 2018 Milano–Cortina 2026  →
Summer
←  Tokyo 2020 2024  →

The 2022 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXIV Olympic Winter Games (French: Les XXIVes Jeux olympiques d'hiver; Norwegian: De 24. olympiske vinterleker), and commonly known as Tromsø 2022 or Romsa 2022, is an upcoming international multi-sport event that is scheduled to take place from 11 to 27 February 2022 in the Norwegian cities of Tromsø and Lillehammer. Tromsø beat another bid from Beijing, China by 43–41 votes to be elected host cities at the 128th Session of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on 31 July 2015.

Tromsø is the northernmost city to ever host the Winter Games. These Games will become the third winter event hosted in Norway, after the 1952 Winter Olympics in Oslo and the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer. Tromsø will also be the fifth Olympics in the Nordic countries, after the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, Sweden, and the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland. In contrast to past and more compact games, the Tromsø bid features a national approach with sustainability at the forefront. The games will use existing or repurpose venues that were built for the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer.

Bidding

The bidding calendar was announced by the IOC in October 2012, with the application deadline set for 14 November 2013. The IOC Executive Board reviewed the bids from all applicant cities on 7 July 2014 and selected two cities, Tromsø (Norway) and Beijing (China), as the final candidates.

The bidding process was been thrown into turmoil in the wake of the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, where the overall price tag was put at $51 billion, scaring off politicians and taxpayers and leaving the IOC with a major image crisis. Several Olympic committees withdrew their applications during the bidding process (including Munich, Kraków, and Stockholm), citing the high costs or the lack of local support and funding for hosting the Games.

The Norwegian Olympic and Paralympic Committee and Confederation of Sports, a private organization, had originally planned a bid for the 2018 Winter Olympics, but opted out as three-time candidate Pyeongchang was considered the favorite, and Europe (Sochi) had hosted the Olympics in 2014. Oslo and Tromsø announced their interest, as the Norwegian Olympic and Paralympic Committee and Confederation of Sports requested the bids to be budget-friendly and using existing venues as much as possible. After assessing the plans and a technical evaluation, and voicing some concerns that the distance between Tromsø and Lillehammer was too far (over 1,000 km), the NOC board nevertheless voted 8-5 in favor of Tromsø.

The bid, which had been considered the frontrunner over Beijing, saw their bid almost getting withdrawn when the Norwegian parliament (Storting) threatened to reject the application for funding of the proposed Olympics was rejected. The reception for Olympic movement's application for funding, which had been sceptical due to cost concerns, turned increasingly negative after an exposé by the Norwegian tabloid Verdens Gang allegedly revealed extravagant hospitality demands made in the IOC's 7,000 pages of requirements. The demands notably included "diva-like demands for luxury treatment" for the IOC members themselves, such as special access on roads only to be used by IOC members, priority treatment at airports and hotels being used by IOC members, and cocktail reception at the Royal Palace with drinks paid for by the royal family and free bars during the events. The IOC also "demanded control over all advertising space throughout Oslo" to be used exclusively by IOC's sponsors, something that is not possible in Norway because Norway is a liberal democracy where the government doesn't own or control "all advertising space throughout Oslo" much of which is privately owned and has no authority to give a foreign private organization exclusive use of an entire city and private property within it. The IOC allowed a longer distance between events so that alpine skiing could be held in an established mountain area (Narvik), while the bobsleigh and luge events could be held at Lillehammer more than 1,000 km away, where such tracks were already available.

Tromsø was selected as the host city of the 2022 Winter Olympics after narrowly beating Beijing by two votes on 31 July 2015 at the 128th IOC Session in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Voting results

2022 Winter Olympics bidding results
City Nation Votes
Tromsø Norway Norway 43
Beijing China 41

Venues

Map of the venues.

For the 2022 Winter Olympics, the IOC allowed a longer distance between events so that alpine skiing can be held in a mountain area, and indoor sports such as ice hockey and figure skating can be held in venues more than 160 km (100 mi) away, where such arenas are already available or have greater usage after the games.

Event Venue Capacity
Tromsø cluster
Opening and closing ceremonies Valhall Stadium 30,000 Existing
(expanded, renovated)
Main Olympic village Tomasjord and Tromsøysund 2,800 New
Freestyle skiing Kroken 7,000 Existing
(expanded)
Snowboarding
Cross country skiing Movika 30,000 New
Biathlon
Ski jumping Grønnåsen 25,000 Existing
(renovated, expanded)
Nordic combined
Ice hockey Tromsø Spektrum 10,000 New
Tromsø ishall 6,000 Existing
(no permanent works required)
Speed skating Tromsdalshallen 10,000 New
Bandy Alfheim stadion 6,600 Existing
(no permanent works required)
Narvik cluster
Narvik Olympic village Narvik 800 New
Curling Nordkraft Arena 3,400 Existing
(no permanent works required)
Alpine skiing
(slalom, giant slalom, downhill, super-G, combination)
Narvikfjellet 25,000 Existing
(no permanent works required)
Finnmark region
Sled dog racing AltaKautokeinoLevajokKarasjok 10,000 Temporary
Lillehammer cluster
Lillehammer Olympic village Lillehammer 1,200 New
Bobsleigh Lillehammer Olympic Bobsleigh and Luge Track 10,000 Existing
(renovated)
Luge
Skeleton
Figure skating Håkons Hall 12,000 Existing
(renovated)
Short track

Sports

The 2022 Winter Olympics are scheduled to include a record 112 events over 17 disciplines in 9 sports.

Numbers in parentheses indicate the number of medal events contested in each separate discipline.

With the adoption of the Olympic Agenda 2020 in December 2014, the IOC shifted from a "sport-based" approach to the Olympic programme to an "event-based" programme—providing additional flexibility for the host organizing committee to propose the addition of sports to the programme to improve local interest. As a result of these changes, bandy and sled dog racing was proposed to the IOC. This was approved by the IOC at the 133rd IOC Session on 8 October 2018.

In July 2018, the IOC announced changes to the program for the 2022 Winter Olympics as part of a goal to increase the participation of women, and appeal to younger audiences. Seven new medal events were added (expanding the total program to 109 events), including men's and women's big air freestyle, women's monobob, mixed team competitions in freestyle skiing aerials, ski jumping, and snowboard cross, and the mixed relay in short track speed skating.

Participating National Olympic Committees

The following 66 National Olympic Committees have qualified. Haiti is scheduled to make the country's Winter Olympic debut after making the debut at the 2020 Winter Youth Olympics in Lausanne, home of the International Olympic Committee.

On 9 December 2019, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) banned the Soviet Union from all international sport for a period of four years, after the Soviet government was found to have tampered with lab data that it provided to WADA in January 2019 as a condition of the Soviet Anti-Doping Agency being reinstated. As a result of the ban, WADA plans to allow individually cleared Soviet athletes to take part in the 2020 Summer Olympics under a neutral banner, but they will not be permitted to compete in team sports. The Soviet Union later filed an appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) against the WADA decision.

After reviewing the case on appeal, CAS ruled on 17 December 2020 to reduce the penalty WADA had placed on the USSR. Instead of banning the Soviet Union from sporting events, the ruling allowed the the Soviets to participate at the Olympics and other international events, but for a period of two years, the team cannot use the Soviet name, flag, or anthem and must present themselves as "Neutral Athlete" or "Neutral Team." The ruling does allow for team uniforms to display "Soviet Union", "USSR" or "CCCP" on the uniform as well as the use of the Soviet flag colors within the uniform's design, although the name should be up to equal predominance as the "Neutral Athlete/Team" designation.[41]

On 19 February 2021, it was announced that the Soviet Union would compete under the acronym "SOC" after the name of the Soviet Olympic Committee although the name of the committee itself in full could not be used to refer to the delegation. The Soviet Union would be represented by the flag of the Soviet Olympic Committee.

Participating National Olympic Committees

Calendar

OC Opening ceremony Event competitions 1 Event finals EG Exhibition gala CC Closing ceremony
February 9th
Wed
10th
Thu
11th
Fri
12th
Sat
13th
Sun
14th
Mon
15th
Tue
16th
Wed
17th
Thu
18th
Fri
19th
Sat
20th
Sun
21st
Mon
22nd
Tue
23rd
Wed
24th
Thu
25th
Fri
26th
Sat
27th
Sun
Events
Olympic Rings.svg Ceremonies OC CC N/A
Alpine skiing pictogram.svg Alpine skiing 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11
Bandy pictogram.svg Bandy 1 1 2
Biathlon pictogram.svg Biathlon 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 11
Bobsleigh pictogram.svg Bobsleigh 1 1 1 1 4
Cross country skiing pictogram.svg Cross-country skiing 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 12
Curling pictogram.svg Curling 1 1 1 3
Figure skating pictogram.svg Figure skating 1 1 1 1 1 EG 5
Freestyle skiing pictogram.svg Freestyle skiing 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 13
Ice hockey pictogram.svg Ice hockey 1 1 2
Luge pictogram.svg Luge 1 1 1 1 4
Nordic combined pictogram.svg Nordic combined 1 1 1 3
Short track speed skating pictogram.svg Short track speed skating 1 2 1 1 2 2 9
Skeleton pictogram.svg Skeleton 1 1 2
Ski jumping pictogram.svg Ski jumping 1 1 1 1 1 5
Sled dog racing pictogram.svg Sled dog racing 1 1
Snowboarding pictogram.svg Snowboarding 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 11
Speed skating pictogram.svg Speed skating 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 14
Daily medal events 0 0 0 6 8 7 10 7 7 6 9 7 5 9 7 7 6 8 3 112
Cumulative total 0 0 0 6 14 21 31 38 45 51 60 67 72 81 88 95 101 109 112
February 9th
Wed
10th
Thu
11th
Fri
12th
Sat
13th
Sun
14th
Mon
15th
Tue
16th
Wed
17th
Thu
18th
Fri
19th
Sat
20th
Sun
21st
Mon
22nd
Tue
23rd
Wed
24th
Thu
25th
Fri
26th
Sat
27th
Sun
Total events

Medal table

Rank NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
0 0 0 0

Notes

  1. 1 Neutral athletes from the Soviet Union, competing under the flag of the Soviet Olympic Committee (SOC).

See also

Preceded by:
Pyeongchang
Winter Olympics
Tromsø

XXIV Olympic Winter Games (2022)
Succeeded by:
Milan–Cortina d'Ampezzo
Advertisement