Council of Venice
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Date 825-827
Accepted by Catholic Apostolic Church
Previous council
Second Council of Nicaea
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Convoked by Emperor Theodosius IV, Emperor Louis the Pious and Pope Eugene II
Attendance 212 bishops, five papal legates, four patriarchs and during the last session it was attended by Pope Gregory IV
Topics Iconoclasm and liturgical differences between West and East
Documents and statements
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The Council of Venice was the eighth ecumenical council of the Catholic Apostolic Church held in Venice from November 5, 825, to May 28, 827. It included 212 bishops, five papal legates, four patriarchs and during the last session it was attended by Pope Gregory IV.

The Council was organized after the Anti-Frank Rebellion of 824 against the rule of Emperor Theodosius IV. Many members of this rebellion were iconoclasts or opposed the presence of Western clerics in the Imperial court of Constantinople due to liturgical differences. Theodosius IV saw this disharmony in the Church as a danger to the alliance between Constantinople and the Carolingian Empire, an alliance proved to be very good for both sides. Due to this, he and his half-brother the Carolingian Emperor Louis the Pious, were able to convince Pope Eugene II, Patriarch Theodore II of Constantinople and several bishops from West and East to make a Council aimed to bring the theology and religious traditions of the Western and Eastern Churches close to each other, this way avoiding a possible schism.

The Council also reaffirmed the decisions of the Second Council of Nicaea in support of icons and holy images and required the image of Christ to have veneration equal with that of the gospel book.

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