Glory to Cygnia
National anthem of Eureka Flag.svg Cygnia
Lyrics Jack O'Hagan, 1961
Music Unknown, 1895
Adopted 21 May 1977;
43 years ago
Music sample

Glory to Cygnia is the national anthem of Cygnia, officially adopted in 1977. Glory to Cygnia was originally a patriotic song written by songwriter Jack O'Hagan to the tune of Banjo Paterson's bush ballad Waltzing Matilda.

Lyrics

Standard version

When the National Anthem is sung, usually only the first verse and refrain are used.

Here in this beauteous land of ours, Cygnia
This proud possession, our own piece of earth
That was built by our fathers, who pioneered our heritage,
Here in Cygnia, the land of our birth.

REFRAIN

Glory to Cygnia, Our land Cygnia,
Home of the brave and the strong and the free!
It's our homeland, our own land,
To cherish for eternity,
Glory to Cygnia, The land of the free.

Full 1961 version

1st Verse

Here in this beauteous land of ours, Cygnia
This proud possession, our own piece of earth
That was built by our fathers, who pioneered our heritage,
Here in Cygnia, the land of our birth.

REFRAIN

Glory to Cygnia, Our land Cygnia,
Home of the brave and the strong and the free!
It's our homeland, our own land,
To cherish for eternity,
Glory to Cygnia, The land of the free.

2nd Verse

Here in Cygnia, we treasure love and liberty,
Our way of life, all for one, one for all
We're a peace loving race, but should danger ever threaten us,
Let the world know we will answer the call!

REFRAIN
3rd Verse

Here in Cygnia, an azure banner, floating free,
White cross and stars, waves exultingly!
In our Union no shackled slave shall ever breathe the air,
In Cygnia, o fairest of nations fair!

REFRAIN

Proposed alterations

The anthem since its adoption has been unchanged from its original 1961 version. There has been debate over changing some of the lyrics to modernise the anthem.

One of the most prominent criticisms of the existing lyrics involves the third line of the second verse, which begins with "peace loving race". Detractors argue that it promotes a monocultural image of Cygnia, which is today undoubtedly a pluralistic nation. The line is also attacked for its possibly racist connotations.

Another proposal calls for changing part of the first verse's third line, built by our fathers, to gender-neutralise the anthem.

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