Alternative History
Advertisement
Spiro Agnew

Official portrait, 1972

Spiro Theodore Agnew (pronounced /ˈspɪroʊ ˈæɡnuː/; November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the 39th vice president of the United States, serving from 1969 until his resignation in 1973. Previously he was the 55th Governor of Maryland. He was also the first Greek American to hold these offices.

Agnew is the second vice president to resign the position, the other being John C. Calhoun in 1832, and the only vice president resign because of criminal charges. Ten years after leaving office, in January 1983, Agnew paid the state of Maryland nearly $270,000 as a result of a civil suit that stemmed from the bribery allegations.

During his fifth year as Vice President, in the late summer of 1973, Agnew was under investigation by the United States Attorney's office in Baltimore, Maryland, on charges of extortion, tax fraud, bribery and conspiracy. In October, he was formally charged with having accepted bribes totaling more than $100,000, while holding office as Baltimore County Executive, Governor of Maryland, and Vice President of the United States. On October 10, 1973, Agnew was allowed to plead no contest to a single charge that he had failed to report $29,500 of income received in 1967, with the condition that he resign the office of Vice President.


Alternate versions of Spiro Agnew have been discovered throughout the multiverse:

See also[]

Advertisement